Shipwrecks and Sand Shoals

Wreck of The MazaruniSome snapshots of the M/V Mazaruni wreck along the banks of the Essequibo…
Wreck of The Mazaruni

And the creek behind the shipwreck, a quiet, shady winding waterway where we spotted boa constrictors in the water, and powder blue morpho butterflies.
Gabriel's Creek
Gabriel's Creek
Gabriel's Creek
Gabriel's Creek

We nearly became a shipwreck, ourselves, entering the Essequibo…we hit a sandy shoal as the tide was going out, and had to sit leaning onto our side for 7 hours, waiting for the tide to come back in and float us free.
Guyana April12 In just two feet of fresh river water, we had the brilliant idea of jumping into the river and making use of the time having a wash, rinsing the accumulated salt from our deck, our dishes…I very nearly did the laundry, but the tide was coming back in by then.

It was a bizarre sight, this sailboat in the middle of that wide river, surrounded by water, walking around their boat, heads crowned with shampoo bubbles…

DSC_0489

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30 thoughts on “Shipwrecks and Sand Shoals

  1. Would love to sse a graphic novel of your adventures. Reminds me of beautiful Corto Maltese drawings of faraway lands reached by boats…so magical. Also dangerous–glad you’re safe!

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  2. Wow. Great jungle shots! There must be epiphytic plants everywhere you guys go . . . air roots are somehow such fascinating things to us. The wreck of the trawler(?) is a treat for my decay-loving eyes. We too wonder what its story is, sitting there, so rusty, yet upright. As for grounding on a sand bar, haven’t we all been there before! Sharynne and I have had a couple too many such incidents, on mudbanks, here in Long Island Sound, on our J/24. We once spent the whole night, after dragging our anchor, drinking, cooking, and sleeping at a 45 degree angle, until we were hauled off the Cold Spring Harbor beach in the morning. At least you guys got a fresh-water bath out of the experience! Best of luck – D & S.

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    1. Yes, we were lucky to be in a river! We couldn’t find anyone who knew the story of the Mazaruni..apparently, it’s been there over 40 years. Still had her huge, solid bronze bushing for the propeller shaft, though most everything else had been taken out. Orchids are aplenty, the flowers are nothing special, but the spider-like leaf-things were nice. Yes, plenty of epiphytes, growing in the aerial roots of bigger trees, swinging 10 metres off the ground…

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    1. I also wanted to turn it into a photo opportunity…tried to talk Kris into setting up a clothesline and a chair in the middle of the river, but tide was coming in by then, and he was concentrating on sailing off the shoal. If we had the furniture I would have loved to set up a couch and coffee table with potted plant in the river, but I would also need distance to photograph it in context… 😉

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    1. I looked, surprisingly little in there…they stripped the engine room, there was nothing but river mud inside, and some ferns. I was hoping, like you, for pythons, birds’ nests, or a small family of monkeys… 😀

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    1. LOL no, no, please, believe me, it’s wonderful but it’s also hard, and I get homesick often, or cry myself to sleep when I am feeling too sorry for myself. The grass only *looks* greener on this blog… 🙂

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