über embroiderers: Emily Barletta

These are the big kids, the superstars, the crème de la crème, the leet of needle and thread…

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I think everyone has seen the work of Emily Barletta, as she has been posting progress photos of these pieces throughout the project.

Emily Barletta has just updated her website, with all new works on paper, and I just had to spread the love a little further. Most of you have seen these before, Emily has been posting them on her blog as she completed them, and a few other craft and stitching sites have featured her, as well. But I want to feature her, anyway, because the category “über embroiderers” would be half empty without her. In case you haven’t seen them before, feast your eyes on these beauties.

Droplets of oil on water. Cross-sections of malachite and other semi-precious stones. The veins in coral or the patterns on feathers. In them I see endless organic patterns, the sort you find when you get really close to bits of surrounding nature.

I think my most burning question for Emily is “How do you reinforce the paper so that you can place the stitches so close together?” Do you think there’s fabric on the back of the paper? Something to think about.

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uber embroiderers: Jazmin Berakha
uber embroiderers: Jazmin Berakha
über embroiderers: Tilleke Schwarz
über embroiderers: Tilleke Schwarz
über embroiderers: Maricor/Maricar
über embroiderers: Maricor/Maricar
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14 thoughts on “über embroiderers: Emily Barletta

  1. wow, just wow. I tried to read this post last week but was having trouble with the network connection while traveling. Back at home and i can see the full content. Truly amazing and I have the exact same question about maintaining stability in her paper. her designs are brilliant – thanks so much for sharing!

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    1. Oh, that’s good then! I remember the first time I saw her work, and developed both a huge crush on it, and a bad inferiority complex as well. 🙂 The world’s a better place for having her art. I’m glad you like the way I write…I think I tend to waffle on too much. Like now. Heh heh…

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  2. that is my burning question too!? I have always wanted to know how it was possible to keep the paper so strong without tearing into other holes when they’re placed so close to one another. Great post anyway thankyou!

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    1. Personally, I stick a layer of fine fabric, like lining silk or even non-woven interfacing on the back of the paper to ‘hold’ the stitches. But it sounds like Emily’s a purist, and has simply worked out, by now, the closest she can possibly place stitches together on the paper she uses.

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  3. Great share. I found this interview (http://blog.otherpeoplespixels.com/414341) and it seemed to me like she may be using a machine to poke the holes and possibly even to stitch the work but it’s still a little vague. Either way, that small glimpse into her process made me admire her work even more.

    By the way, thanks again for creating that embroidered feather for me. I truly love it.

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    1. Thanks for the link to that interview. I don’t see a mention of machine work at all, though it also seems that she doesn’t reinforce the work on the back with fabric, either. Which means she can only poke the holes just so close and no closer. Fascinating. Constrained, but then constraints often provide fantastic impetus for creativity.

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